GBA+ Awareness Week 2017

GBA+ Awareness Week 2017 Banner

From May 29 to June 2, 2017, the Government of Canada is celebrating its 6th annual GBA+ Awareness week. This year’s theme is GBA+: Inclusion. Innovation. For the next 150.

As Canada celebrates the 150th anniversary of Confederation, we are looking to the future — a future where Canada leads the world in innovation and inclusive growth. Gender-based Analysis Plus can help us get there.

Diversity drives innovation.

It takes a wide range of perspectives, insights and expertise to develop and implement new ideas. As Canada works to position itself as a world leader in innovation, it needs to harness the talents of all Canadians. That’s where Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+) comes in.

GBA+ is the key

GBA+ is an analytical tool used to assess the potential impacts of policies, programs, services, legislation and other initiatives on diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people. It is just one tool the Government of Canada is using to ensure inclusive growth and an economy that works for everyone.

Take part in GBA+ Awareness Week

GBA+ Awareness Week is a chance for federal organizations to plan learning events and activities that highlight how GBA+ supports their work and creates effective policies, programs and services for all Canadians. Here's how you can get involved:

Watch our micro-learning videos:

GBA+: Beyond Sex and Gender

GBA+: Beyond Sex and Gender - Transcript

We’ve all heard it: “You can’t really understand another person’s experience until
you’ve walked a mile in their shoes.”

Shoes aren’t one-size-fits-all and neither are policies, programs and services.

That’s what gender-based analysis plus (or GBA+) is all about.
So, how does it work?

Doing a gender-based analysis means gathering information on how different groups of people
may experience the same situation differently.

This is your chance to identify risks and opportunities as you design your initiative…and

create appropriate mitigation strategies.
Let’s start at the beginning.
What makes you who you are?
Is it your age?

Your ethnic background?
Where you live?
It’s all of this and more.

These are called identity factors.
Sex and gender are two identity factors that are the starting points for GBA+.

The terms “sex” and “gender” are often used interchangeably but they are actually
separate concepts.

Sex refers to a set of biological attributes and is associated with physical and physiological
features.

Sex is usually categorized as female or male but there is variation in biological attributes
and how those attributes are expressed.

Gender, on the other hand, refers to the socially constructed roles, behaviours, expressions
and identities of individuals.

Gender helps determine how people perceive themselves and each other and how they act
and interact.

It can even have an impact on how power and resources are distributed in a society.
We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are.

This is called intersectionality.
The “plus” in gender-based analysis plus acknowledges that GBA goes beyond sex and gender.

It examines how sex and gender intersect with other identities such as: race, ethnicity,
religion, age or mental or physical disability.

Use GBA+ to examine all the intersecting identity factors of diverse groups of people so that
you can be more inclusive in your approach to developing, delivering and evaluating initiatives.

Visit Status of Women Canada and check out our Demystifying GBA+ job aid on GCpedia.
Information is available upon request for those outside the Government of Canada.

GBA+: Equality or Equity?

GBA+: Equality or Equity? - Transcript

There is a lot of buzz in Canada about gender equality.  What does equality look like?
How do we achieve it? Is it about treating everyone equally?

Many of us have seen variations of this illustration.  It compares equality and equity.

These concepts are related, but not the same.

In this scene, everyone is treated exactly the same, with the assumption that all people
will benefit equally.  This scene shows equal treatment.

Equity is the quality of being fair, which often requires treatment that is not the same. Individuals are given different supports so that they have equal access to the view. They are being treated equitably.  This scene shows equity.

In this scene, the systemic barrier for the viewers is removed.  All three have access to the view without any supports or accommodations. This scene demonstrates true equality.

Gender equality means that all genders have equal conditions for realizing their full human rights.

They are equal participants in their home, their community and their society.

Different groups of people may experience the same situation differently, such as access to services and employment, and the experience of violence.

Barriers can be formal or informal, intentional or unintentional.

So, how can we identify and remove these systemic barriers?

Gender-based Analysis Plus (or GBA+) is an analytical tool used to assess how diverse
groups of people may experience initiatives.

The “plus” acknowledges that GBA goes beyond sex and gender. It also includes the consideration of many other identity factors.

We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are.  And, equity and equality aren’t only about gender.

Many benefit from removing barriers for groups of people.  Consider …

• Large print versions of documents for the visually impaired
• Uniforms that allow for religious wear
• Family washrooms for parents with young childern

• Flexible parental leave policies 

Each of us has biases that can make it hard to know if and when equitable actions are
needed. Use GBA+ as a guide, to challenge your assumptions and to learn more about how
diverse people may experience policies, programs and everyday conditions. By taking equitable
action today, we set the stage for true equality tomorrow.

Visit Status of Women Canada and check out our Demystifying GBA+ job aid on GCpedia.

Information is available upon request for those outside the Government of Canada.

Share the facts:

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What is Gender-based Analysis Plus?

Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) is an analytical tool used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people may experience policies, programs and initiatives. It’s not just sex and gender that are considered as part of a GBA+— the “plus” refers to all the other identity factors that are taken into account, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.

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Use GBA+ to challenge your assumptions

We all have preconceived notions that shape how we see the world. GBA+ allows us to examine and challenge our own assumptions about an issue or a group of people. This is the first step to addressing inequality.

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GBA+ is not just for social policy

GBA+ is not just for the social policy sectors like healthcare, childcare and education. It should be applied to all aspects of the Government’s work, including highly operational sectors, such as, military and defence, border management, corrections and other public security sectors.

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Use GBA+ to monitor and evaluate your results

GBA+ should be used at all stages of the policy cycle, from development, togreat implementation, to evaluation.

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GBA+: The road to equality

Gender equality means that diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people are able to participate fully in all aspects of Canadian life, contributing to an inclusive and democratic society.

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