2018–19 Departmental Plan

ISSN 2371-7939

Minister’s message

Photograph of the Honourable Maryam Monsef, P.C., M.P. Minister of Status of Women

Welcome to our 2018–19 Departmental Plan for Status of Women Canada (SWC). It provides information about the work we do, and the results we are focussed on achieving in support of the federal government’s key priority of advancing gender equality.

Last year provided us with countless opportunities to celebrate our country’s tremendous progress towards equality. We are inspired by the legacy of generations of women who have spoken truth to power, broken down barriers, and opened doors of opportunity for millions of women and girls following in their footsteps. Yet we know there remains much work to be done.

Over the next year, we intend to build on the momentum created by the activism across our country, the Me Too and Times Up movements, and the Women’s Marches globally. Together they have placed a new level of public focus on the need to end gender bias in all facets of our daily lives, and on feminism as a positive force for social progress and change. Budget 2018, the first-ever federal budget to apply an intersectional gender lens to its measures, is a response to this growing demand for concrete action to advance gender equality in Canada.

Earlier this year, I was moved by the increased attention to gender issues at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, due in part, I believe, to Canada’s leadership. It was also a reminder to those in decision-making positions that to make equality a reality, we must listen, learn, and ultimately lead with our actions.

That is why as Minister, I’m proud of the progress we have made over the past year on SWC’s four key priorities: addressing gender-based violence (GBV), increasing the economic security and prosperity of women and girls, supporting their advancement in leadership roles, and improving the quality of the Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+) applied to Cabinet proposals from all government departments and agencies. Likewise, I am proud of our role in ensuring that all measures in Budget 2018 were subject to a GBA+ analysis, and that it included a new Gender Results Framework that will guide future decision-making and measure our progress in creating an economy that works for everyone.

This year, new GBA+ legislation will be introduced to enshrine gender budgeting within the federal budget-making process. We will continue enhancing the use of GBA+ across federal organizations so that an intersectional gender lens is carefully applied to the Government of Canada’s decision-making on policies, programs, and services. I look forward to sharing the results and best practices of these efforts when we host a national roundtable on GBA+ in 2018.

We will also continue working with our federal colleagues to develop evidence-based measures that help reduce the wage gap between men and women, increase the number of women in senior decision-making positions and on boards, and support more women to enter fields where they are under-represented.

One of our Government’s key goals is to work with Canadians to build an inclusive, safe and respectful society, especially by speaking out and taking actions to stop GBV.

In June, I announced It’s Time: Canada’s Strategy to Prevent and Address Gender-Based Violence, with an investment of $100.9 million over five years, and a further $20.7 million per year thereafter. We will be very proactive in implementing this first ever federal GBV strategy over the coming year. This includes initiatives such as a $20 million call for concepts under the new Gender-Based Violence Program, which supports organizations to develop and implement promising practices that, in turn, support survivors of GBV and their families, including underserved populations. In response to the needs and concerns expressed by service providers, this initiative provided us with an opportunity to announce changes to the way SWC does business and how we support organizations. Such adjustments include new investments to provide these groups with the supports they need to fill in funding applications, an extension of project funding from three to up to five years, an increase in grants up to $1 million, and an expansion of eligible groups to include organized labour, for example.

As part of the federal GBV strategy, SWC is leading efforts to better align existing resources and actions across the federal government to help end GBV. This coordinated approach will improve the development and sharing of research and data to inform these actions and achieve concrete, measureable results.

In recognition of the need to further our support to survivors of GBV and their families, Budget 2018 announced that we will invest an additional $86 million over five years, starting in 2018-19, in the GBV Strategy. This funding will help prevent teen dating violence, support rape crisis and sexual assault centres, and address online child exploitation. Further budget funding will support victims of sexual harassment in the workplace and at post-secondary institutions.

Besides addressing GBV, SWC’s Women’s Program will continue to provide funding to projects that remove persistent barriers to women participating fully in the economic, social and democratic life of Canada. As a result of Budget 2018, an additional $100 million will be invested over five years to support this essential work. Furthermore, in recognition of the critical role that youth, and men and boys, play in advancing gender equality, we will also lead a national conversation on gender equality with young Canadians, as well as develop an engagement strategy to bring men and boys into the discussion on gender equality.

Finally, our Government has established an international agenda that prioritizes gender equality. In November 2017, I represented Canada at the first G7 Ministerial Meeting on Gender Equality in Taormina, Italy. The progress we made there has created the momentum to help Canada put equality at the centre of the agenda during its G7 Presidency this year. In fact, Advancing Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment is one of the key themes that will be embedded in all government-to-government meetings of Ministers as part of the G7, with the goal of creating economies and societies where everyone has a real and fair chance at success.

We would not be able to have these big dreams and to achieve our ambitious, but necessary goals without first having a solid base to work with. I am incredibly proud that the Government of Canada will finally be making SWC an official Department, creating a legislative basis for SWC that solidifies and formalizes its important role within the federal government and strengthens its capacity. With that said, our success depends on a whole-of-government approach that allows us to advance gender equality by tackling existing barriers from all angles. This collaboration is rendered possible thanks to our feminist Prime Minister’s leadership, and to all colleagues who recognize that when we invest in women, we strengthen the economy – and society as a whole – for everyone. 

In the coming year, I look forward to our continued collaboration as we share ideas and take actions in our communities to bring equality closer to reality. This is not just the right thing to do; it is also the smart thing to do if we are to build the inclusive country we want for mothers, daughters, grandmothers, sisters, and friends.

Thank you for your passionate commitment to equality for all.



The Honourable Maryam Monsef, P.C.M.P.

Plans at a glance

In 2018–19, Status of Women Canada (SWC) will continue to mobilize partners and promote equality between women and men by proactively engaging with individuals and institutions and with international, local and national partners. Consistent with commitments in the Minister’s mandate letter, SWC will focus its efforts on building awareness, knowledge and capacity to bring about institutional and systemic changes aligned with the government-wide priorities of gender equality, diversity and inclusiveness.

SWC works with federal departments and agencies, provincial/territorial governments, as well as private and civil society organizations that have the levers to advance equality for women through policy, programs and organizational practices. In 2018–19, SWC will contribute to advancing gender equality by focusing on four priority areas:

Implementation of “It’s Time: Canada’s Strategy to Prevent and Address Gender-based Violence”

This whole-of-government strategy aims to reduce the prevalence of gender-based violence (GBV) in Canada and improve support and services for Canadians impacted by GBV. In 2018–19, SWC will:

  • Establish the GBV Knowledge Centre, an interactive, collaborative, community-driven hub of critical resources for knowledge transfer on GBV
  • Develop and share knowledge products on GBV with stakeholders
  • Fund and share research to address knowledge gaps related to GBV
  • Engage youth, including men and boys, in a national dialogue on GBV
  • Promote action through commemoration events such as the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-based Violence
  • Invest, through grants and contributions, in projects that support civil society organizations to better address the needs of underserved populations

Integration of Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+) across the federal government

Government-wide implementation of GBA+ is expected to create more responsive federal policies and programs that systematically consider the needs of diverse groups of people. In 2018–19, SWC will:

  • Continue to implement and review the Government of Canada’s Action Plan on Gender-based Analysis Plus, in collaboration with central agencies and other federal departments
  • Support the comprehensive integration of GBA+ throughout the policy, legislative and program development and evaluation cycle
  • Monitor and report on the implementation of GBA+ in the federal government
  • Develop and maintain a central hub for GBA+ resources
  • Work with other federal departments to introduce new GBA+ legislation to enshrine gender budgeting in the federal government
  • Host a national roundtable on GBA+ to promote its use, and share best practices

Strategic support and investment to address systemic barriers to gender equality

Strategic interventions to address systemic barriers are expected to reduce violence against women and girls, as well as increase economic security and prosperity for women and more equal representation of women and men in leadership roles and at all levels of decision-making. In 2018–19, SWC will:

  • Provide technical expertise to federal departments and agencies to address matters related to gender equality, including: proactive pay equity, gender diversity on corporate boards, women’s economic security and labour force participation
  • Undertake research and data collection in support of the Gender Results Framework
  • Invest, through grants and contributions, in projects that address systemic barriers to gender equality and support the sustainability of equality-seeking organizations
  • Host a national dialogue on gender equality with Canadians, including exploring ways to better engage men and boys as part of the solution to a more inclusive society
  • Promote action through commemoration initiatives such as International Day of the Girl, Persons Day and International Women’s Day
  • Fund and share research to fill knowledge gaps on issues related to gender equality
  • Collaborate with provincial/territorial counterparts, whose involvement is essential to advancing gender equality

International engagement to advance gender equality

Meaningful engagement with our partners around the world is expected to contribute in addressing the many challenges gender equality faces globally and at home, and to strengthen Canada’s position on gender equality in the world. In 2018–19, SWC will:

  • Lead the integration of GBA+ throughout Canada’s 2018 G7 Presidency
  • Collaborate with Global Affairs Canada to prepare for Canada’s participation in the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women
  • Support the development of Canada’s strategy to advance the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda and Sustainable Development Goals
  • Provide advice and recommendations in support of Canada’s feminist approach to foreign policy

For more information on Status of Women Canada’s plans, priorities and planned results, see the “Planned results” section of this report.

Planned results: what we want to achieve this year and beyond

Core Responsibility

Mobilizing Partners and Promoting Equality for Women and Girls

Description

Status of Women Canada mobilizes partners and promotes equality between women and men by proactively engaging with individuals and institutions and with international, local and national partners. Status of Women Canada increases awareness of gender equality and enables federal organizations to systematically incorporate gender-based analysis into federal policies and programs. Status of Women Canada also assists other partners and institutions, through its expertise, contribution to research and knowledge development on issues of women and leadership, women and the economy and gender-based violence, and funding to community initiatives, to improve women’s social and economic well-being.

Planning highlights

Status of Women Canada (SWC) focuses on building awareness, knowledge and capacity in order to bring about institutional and systemic changes aligned with the government-wide priority of gender equality, diversity and inclusiveness. While SWC is the primary federal agency responsible for promoting equality between women and men, gender equality issues go beyond its reach. To achieve results, SWC collaborates with many organizations, key stakeholders in all levels of government as well as the private and voluntary sectors.

Over the past two years, gender equality’s visibility has increased, attracting renewed attention domestically and internationally. Budget 2018 announced historic measures to advance gender equality, including the introduction of departmental legislation that will solidify and formalize the important roles of SWC and its Minister. In addition, SWC will work with other federal departments to introduce new Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+) legislation to enshrine gender budgeting in the federal government’s budgetary and financial management processes, and ensure that gender considerations remain a key consideration in years to come.

SWC is committed to building on the current momentum to sustain and broaden engagement, including by engaging men and boys to become champions and partners in advancing gender equality. SWC will also invest significantly in research to fill knowledge gaps on issues relevant to gender equality. By developing and sharing knowledge with a broader and more engaged audience, SWC can increase its influence, and ultimately contribute to reducing gender inequalities.

In 2018–19, SWC will continue to make progress on the Government of Canada’s vision for advancing gender equality, focusing on commitments outlined in the Minister’s mandate letter. To accomplish this, SWC will work collaboratively with other federal departments and agencies, provincial/territorial governments, and private and civil society organizations that have the levers to move equality for women forward.

Over the reporting period, SWC will deliver results for Canadians and contribute to advancing gender equality by focusing its efforts in four priority areas: implementation of Canada’s Strategy to Prevent and Address Gender-Based Violence; integration of Gender-based Analysis Plus across the federal government; strategic support and investments to address systemic barriers to gender equality; and international engagement to advance gender equality.

Implementation of Canada’s Strategy to Prevent and Address Gender-Based Violence

Gender-based violence (GBV) is a significant and preventable barrier to gender equality with far reaching impacts for individuals, families and communities. In June 2017, the Minister of Status of Women launched It's Time: Canada's Strategy to Prevent and Address Gender-Based Violence. Budget 2018 announced additional funding of $86 million over five years and $20 million per year ongoing to expand the Strategy.

As the Agency responsible for leading the whole-of-government Strategy, SWC will foster evidence-based decision making and action, ensure coordinated federal actions and systematic engagement with provincial/territorial and external stakeholders, promote positive and respectful attitudes and behaviours, and support communities in their efforts to address existing gaps in support to survivors.

In 2018–19, SWC will establish the GBV Knowledge Centre (KC). Knowledge transfer and uptake, in support of evidence-based decision-making, are primary goals of the KC. The KC will serve as a hub to develop and share responsive and useful knowledge products with stakeholders, and to connect researchers with service providers, Indigenous organizations, and federal, provincial, and territorial governments. An online searchable portal will be developed to provide a single point of entry for GBV sector policy makers and service providers.

In addition, SWC will fund and share research to address knowledge gaps related to GBV in Canada. The Agency will continue to work with stakeholders to develop and implement three new national surveys, which will be delivered by Statistics Canada:

  • The Survey of Safety in Public and Private Spaces, focusing on the incidence and consequences of GBV, will be implemented in 2018–19, with results expected to be released in fall 2019;
  • A survey on sexual victimization and harassment among post-secondary students is expected to be implemented in 2018–19, with results expected to be released in 2019–20; and
  • A survey on inappropriate sexual behaviour in the workplace will be developed in 2018–19. Preliminary plans are for implementation to occur in 2020–21 and for data to be released in 2021–22.

These surveys will provide a powerful series of reliable data to monitor trends in the levels of various forms of GBV in Canada and to assess the effectiveness of policies, actions and initiatives across the country in reducing GBV and improving survivors’ experiences with the justice, social and health systems.

To address knowledge gaps related to GBV in Indigenous communities, SWC will continue to explore partnerships with Indigenous researchers and data collection organizations as it develops a research plan to collect GBV data on reserve. A large program of qualitative research will also be developed to strengthen knowledge of GBV among underserved groups.

To counteract attitudes that devalue femininity and condone violence among youth, and to promote values of gender equality, SWC will launch an awareness initiative to engage youth, including men and boys, in a national dialogue on GBV and the important role that they play in violence prevention. In addition, SWC will continue to build awareness and encourage action and social change through annual initiatives such as the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence. These initiatives encourage engaged individuals to become champions for gender equality and contribute to changing the social norms, attitudes and behaviours that lead to GBV.

Finally, the Strategy aims to improve access to services for underserved populations and improve health and social outcomes of those impacted by GBV. To achieve these results, SWC will fund, through its grants and contributions program, the development and implementation of promising practices that strengthen the GBV sector to better address the needs of underserved populations, including Indigenous women, women living with a disability or exceptionality, non-status/refugee/immigrant women, young women, LGBTQ2, gender non-conforming people and ethno-cultural women.

Integration of Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+) across the federal government

Effective integration of GBA+ throughout government will result in improved decision-making for Canadians by helping the Government identify and consider the impact policies, programs and services have on various groups of women, men and gender-diverse people. Within the federal government, SWC is the lead organization that helps departments and agencies implement GBA+. SWC supports the integration of GBA+ throughout the policy, legislative, program development and evaluation cycle.

Over the reporting period, SWC will continue to implement the Action Plan on Gender-based Analysis (2016-2020) to address recommendations of the Fall 2015 Report of the Auditor General of Canada on Gender-based Analysis.

Further, SWC will identify opportunities to strengthen GBA+ implementation as the Agency develops a renewed action plan that will build on progress made since 2016. Of note, SWC will work with an innovation lab to identify practices that contribute to more effective GBA+ implementation in some government departments and agencies.

As the Government of Canada’s centre of expertise on GBA+, SWC develops and shares knowledge products, training, and tools to build GBA+ capacity and support its application across the federal government. By building capacity across the federal government, SWC enables other departments and agencies to systematically consider gender equality in their policies and programs. In 2018–19, SWC will continue to develop and maintain a central hub of GBA+ resources accessible to all federal officials. To further support GBA+ across the federal government, SWC will continue to work with Statistics Canada and other federal organizations to identify and address data gaps in order to improve the availability and use of gender-disaggregated data.

SWC will also continue to collaborate with central agencies to support the comprehensive incorporation of GBA+ considerations in Cabinet documents and Treasury Board submissions, as well as in government consultations, budgeting, and reporting. Building on Budgets 2017 and 2018, SWC will work closely with the Department of Finance Canada to further develop and enhance the Government’s gender budgeting practices. The gender governance review report of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), expected in the summer of 2018, will help identify opportunities to improve Canada’s approach to gender budgeting and promotion of gender equality. As announced in Budget 2018, SWC will work with other federal departments to introduce new GBA+ legislation to enshrine gender budgeting in the federal government’s budgetary and financial management processes, and ensure that gender considerations remain a key consideration in years to come.

In 2018, SWC will host a national roundtable on GBA+ that will focus on sharing results and best practices. The roundtable is intended to help strengthen awareness of GBA+, promote its use by other levels of government, involve civil society, and identify and discuss opportunities for improvement.

Strategic support and investments to address systemic barriers to gender equality

Gender equality considerations have implications for most policies and programs developed and delivered by the Government of Canada. Specifically, the Minister of Status of Women has been mandated to support the Government’s efforts to reduce the wage gap, increase the number of women in senior decision-making positions and on boards, and improve representation of women in under-represented fields. To achieve these results, SWC will engage with other federal departments and agencies to develop and implement initiatives related to gender equality issues, including: proactive pay equity; women’s representation on corporate boards; diversity in Governor in Council appointments and federal leadership positions; support to women entrepreneurs; and, critical social investments for women’s economic security and labour force participation, including the National Housing Strategy, Early Learning and Childcare (ELCC) Framework, the Indigenous ELCC Framework, and the Poverty Reduction Strategy.

Over the past year, SWC collaborated with the Department of Finance Canada, Global Affairs Canada and Statistics Canada to develop a whole-of-government framework for measuring and monitoring gender equality in Canada. This framework was used to frame the narrative for Budget 2018’s gender statement. Budget 2018 announced additional funding that will allow SWC to undertake research and data collection in support of this framework.

Through the Women’s Program, SWC will continue to provide funding and support to Canadian organizations that address violence against women and girls, advance the representation of women and girls in leadership and decision-making roles, as well as to organizations that work to strengthen women’s economic security and prosperity. The Women’s Program allows SWC to invest strategically in projects that address systemic barriers to gender equality. A multi-year plan ensures that funding is focused on key intervention areas to maximize the Women’s Program contribution to achieving SWC’s mandate. Budget 2018 announced $100 million over five years in additional funding to enhance the Women’s Program. This investment will support the sustainability of equality-seeking organizations by increasing organizational and sector capacity and ensuring better funding for organizations focused on vulnerable women. Following an evaluation of the Women’s Program, SWC will begin implementing management responses to address recommendations related to program design, knowledge translation, and support throughout project lifecycle.

SWC will also continue to undertake high-profile initiatives to promote and commemorate gender equality, including the International Day of the Girl, Persons Day and International Women’s Day. These initiatives focus on raising awareness and encourage engagement in conversations and action to further gender equality.

Progress on gender equality requires a broad socio-cultural shift. As such, SWC will host a national dialogue on gender equality, and undertake a series of engagement activities to explore the role of men and boys in breaking down established norms and biases.

SWC will continue to invest in research and knowledge development by funding and sharing research to fill knowledge gaps on issues relevant to gender equality. In 2018–19, research will focus on: economic well-being; work-life balance; child care; the gender wage gap; gendered segmentation of educational fields and occupations; and leadership in the public and private spheres.

Recognizing the primary role of provinces and territories in the delivery of programs and services to address existing inequalities, SWC will continue to strengthen engagement and collaborative relationships through the Federal-Provincial/Territorial Forum of Ministers Responsible for the Status of Women. In particular, SWC will provide leadership and technical expertise as the Forum’s task teams work to advance joint priorities for the coming year, including: the gender wage gap; women’s economic empowerment; engagement with National Indigenous Leaders and Representatives to discuss topics of shared interest; and supporting the capacity of organizations working for gender equality.

International engagement to advance gender equality

On the international stage, gender equality is attracting renewed interest and Canada is committed to leading by example. SWC supports Canada’s leadership role by engaging with individuals and institutions at the international level to promote gender equality. As the primary federal agency responsible for advancing gender equality, the current context presents a unique opportunity for SWC to engage and collaborate with a broader network of stakeholders, further develop its expertise, and promote evidence-based measures that will contribute to greater inclusiveness in Canada and around the world. Through meaningful engagement with our partners around the world, Canada can help address the many challenges to gender equality globally and at home.

In particular, SWC will support Canada’s efforts to promote and advance gender equality through the 2018 G7 presidency. In December 2017, the Prime Minister announced that ‘Advancing gender equality and women’s empowerment’ would be one of five key themes of Canada’s 2018 G7 presidency. In collaboration with Global Affairs Canada, SWC will support the Gender Equality Advisory Council and the integration of GBA+ throughout all ministerial meetings and the 2018 G7 Leaders’ Summit in Charlevoix, Quebec. Applying GBA+ throughout the 2018 G7 presidency is an opportunity for Canada to drive concrete outcomes for women and girls across all themes in G7 countries and beyond.

International engagement also allows SWC to support the gender equality movement and give voice to issues of gender inequality. In 2018–19, SWC will:

  • collaborate with Global Affairs Canada to prepare for Canada’s participation in the 2019 session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (CSW63), the principal global policy-making body dedicated to gender equality and the advancement of women;
  • support the development, implementation and communication of Canada’s gender-responsive strategy to advance the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda and Sustainable Development Goals; and
  • provide recommendations to support Canada’s feminist approach to foreign policy and efforts to champion gender equality and women’s empowerment through bilateral, regional and multilateral engagement (e.g., Organization of American States, Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, La Francophonie, Commonwealth).

Planned spending for 2018–19 to 2020–21 is expected to remain relatively stable. Requirements for full-time equivalents are also projected to remain stable for the next three years.

Planned results
Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2014–15 
Actual results
2015–16
Actual  results
2016–17 
Actual  results
Status of Women Canada’s interventions influence and support the advancement of gender equality Percentage of Status of Women Canada funded projects that have an impact on reducing systemic barriers to gender equality Not availableTable note * Not availableTable note * Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note **
Percentage of stakeholders that found resources from the Gender-based Violence Knowledge Centre to be useful in their work Greater than 75% March 2020 Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note **
Number of partnerships or coalitions with governments, and international, Indigenous, civil society and women’s equality organizations Not availableTable note * Not availableTable note * Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note **
Social media reach of Status of Women Canada’s promotion / commemoration of gender equality initiatives Not availableTable note * Not availableTable note * Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note **
The federal government systematically considers gender equality Percentage of federal organizations satisfied with tools and resources to incorporate gender equality considerations into their work Greater than 68% March 2019 Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note **
Number of major new federal initiatives (e.g. policies and programs) that include specific measures to advance gender equality Not availableTable note * Not availableTable note * Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note **
Increased gender equality in Canada Canada’s Global Gender Gap score Greater than 0.769 March 2019 Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note **
Number of women victims of homicide in an intimate relationship context in Canada Less than 198 March 2019 Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note **
Percentage of women who report experiencing any form of sexual violence Not availableTable note *** Not availableTable note *** Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note **
Percentage of leadership positions held by women in public and private sectors in Canada Not availableTable note * Not availableTable note * Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note **
Average hourly wage gap between women and men in Canada Less than $0.87 March 2019 Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note **
Percentage of women living in low income households in Canada Less than 14.7% March 2019 Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note ** Not availableTable note **
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
52,869,386 52,869,386 53,886,487 50,995,282
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19  Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20  Planned full-time equivalents 2020–21  Planned full-time equivalents
126 131 129

Financial, human resources and performance information for Status of Women Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
9,475,409 9,475,409 9,522,874 9,364,374
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19  Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20  Planned full-time equivalents 2020–21  Planned full-time equivalents
81 83 82
Planning highlights

Since 2015, the Government has articulated a strong commitment to advance gender equality, which includes appointing a full Minister of Status of Women. Since 2016–17, SWC’s has received increased funding to establish a more comprehensive range of internal functions, including those associated with supporting a full Minister, and to enhance the policy supports required to deliver on Government priorities. In fiscal year 2018–19, SWC will receive additional funding of $18.8 million to support key activities of the whole-of-government Strategy to Prevent and Address Gender-Based Violence. As a result of these increases, SWC’s workforce will increase significantly, nearly doubling in size from 2016–17.

These resources will allow SWC to support the Minister in delivering on her mandate commitments, which include providing gender-based advice and leadership in Cabinet and implementing Canada’s Gender-based Violence Strategy. This will strengthen SWC capacity to address complex, long-standing socio-cultural and economic issues that contribute to gender inequality, thereby supporting the Government’s commitment to advancing gender equality.

In 2018–19, SWC’s internal services functions will continue to build organizational capacity, with a particular focus on: attracting, accommodating and retaining a highly qualified workforce; strengthening its organizational structure and internal processes; and ensuring a balanced and positive work environment for SWC employees.

Spending and human resources

Planned spending

Departmental Spending Trend Graph (thousands of dollars)
Fiscal year 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21
Statutory 1,229 1,601 2,215 2,791 2,897 2,853
Voted 28,313 34,701 42,390 59,554 60,512 57,507
Total 29,542 36,302 44,605 62,345 63,409 60,360
Budgetary planning summary for Core Responsibility and Internal Services (dollars)
Core Responsibility and Internal Services 2015–16  Expenditures 2016–17
Expenditures
2017–18
Forecast spending
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
Mobilizing Partners and Promoting Equality for Women and Girls 24,311,805 28,090,317 34,006,037 52,869,386 52,869,386 53,886,487 50,995,282
Subtotal 24,311,805 28,090,317 34,006,037 52,869,386 52,869,386 53,886,487 50,995,282
Internal Services 5,230,596 7,179,299 10,598,607 9,475,409 9,475,409 9,522,874 9,364,374
Total 29,542,401 35,269,616 44,604,644 62,344,795 62,344,795 63,409,361 60,359,656

The increase in planned spending over the past three years is due to new investments received through Budget 2016 and Budget 2017:

  • Through Budget 2016, SWC received new investments of $33.0 million over five years and $7.5 million ongoing to increase its capacity and establish the permanent corporate structures necessary to support a full minister, carry out government business and deliver on the Government’s priorities.
  • Through Budget 2017, SWC received new investments of $77.5 million over five years and $16 million per year thereafter to establish Canada’s Strategy to Prevent and Address Gender-Based Violence.

Planned spending for 2018–19 to 2020–21 is expected to remain relatively stable.

Planned human resources

Human resources planning summary for Core Responsibility and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)
Core Responsibility and Internal Services 2015–16
Actual full-time equivalents
2016–17
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Forecast full-time equivalents 
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2020–21
Planned full-time equivalents
Mobilizing Partners and Promoting Equality for Women and Girls 55 62 93 126 131 129
Subtotal 55 62 93 126 131 129
Internal Services 44 51 76 81 83 82
Total 99 113 169 207 214 211

Increases in full-time equivalents from 2016–17 to 2019–20 are mainly due to new investments received through Budget 2016 and Budget 2017. Budget 2016 announced funding to allow SWC to increase the capacity and establish the permanent corporate structures necessary to support a full minister, carry out government business and deliver on the Government’s priorities while Budget 2017 announced new investments to establish Canada’s Strategy to Prevent and Address Gender-Based Violence. Requirements for full-time equivalents are projected to remain relatively stable for the next three years.

Estimates by vote

For information on Status of Women Canada’s organizational appropriations, consult the 2018–19 Main Estimates.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of Status of Women Canada’s operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on Status of Women Canada’s website.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
for the year ended March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial information 2017–18
Forecast results
2018–19
Planned results
Difference
(2018–19 Planned results minus 2017–18 Forecast results)
Total expenses 47,974,000 65,620,000 17,646,000
Total revenues 0 0 0
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 47,974,000 65,620,000 17,646,000

The difference between 2018–19 planned results and 2017–18 forecast results is due to additional funding to increase capacity, establish the permanent corporate structure to support a full minister and support key activities of the whole-of-government Strategy to Prevent and Address Gender-Based Violence.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Maryam Monsef

Institutional head: Gina Wilson

Ministerial portfolio: Canadian Heritage

Enabling instrument: Order in Council (1976-779)

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1976

Raison d’être, mandate and role

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on Status of Women Canada’s website.

Operating context and key risks

Information on operating context and key risks is available on Status of Women Canada’s website.

Reporting framework

Status of Women Canada’s Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2018–19 are shown below:

Departmental Results Framework Core Responsibility:
Mobilizing Partners and Promoting Equality for Women and Girls
Internal Services
Departmental Result:
Status of Women Canada (SWC)'s interventions influence and support the advancement of gender equality
Indicator: Percentage of SWC funded projects that have an impact on reducing systemic barriers to gender equality
Indicator: Percentage of stakeholders that found resources from the Gender-Based Violence Knowledge Centre to be useful in their work
Indicator: Number of partnerships or coalitions with governments, and international, indigenous, civil society and women's equality organizations
Indicator: Social media reach of SWC's promotion/commemoration of gender equality initiatives
Departmental Result:
The federal government systematically considers gender equality
Indicator: Percentage of federal organizations satisfied with tools and resources to incorporate gender equality considerations into their work
Indicator: Number of major new federal initiatives (e.g., policies and programs) that include specific measures to advance gender equality
Departmental Result:
Increased gender equality in Canada
Indicator: Canada's Global Gender Gap score
Indicator: Number of women victims of homicide in an intimate relationship context in Canada
Indicator: Percentage of women who report experiencing any form of sexual violence
Indicator: Percentage of leadership positions held by women in public and private sectors in Canada
Indicator: Average hourly wage gap between women and men in Canada
Indicator: Percentage of women living in low income households in Canada
Program Inventory Program: Expertise and Outreach
Program: Community Action and Innovation
Concordance between the Departmental Results Framework and the Program Inventory, 2018–19, and the Program Alignment Architecture, 2017–18
2018–19 Core Responsibility and Program Inventory 2017–18 Lowest-level program of the Program Alignment Architecture Percentage of lowest-level Program Alignment Architecture program (dollars) corresponding to the program in the Program Inventory
Core Responsibility: Mobilizing Partners and Promoting Equality for Women and Girls
Program A: Expertise and Outreach 1.1 Strategic Advice, Expertise and Promotion of Gender Equality 100%
Program B: Community Action and Innovation 1.2 Advancing Equality for Women 100%

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to Status of Women Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on Status of Women Canada’s website:

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

For financial information, contact:
Anik Lapointe
Chief Financial Officer and Director
Corporate Services Directorate
Telephone: 819-420-6825 Fax: 819-420-6906
E-mail: Anik.Lapointe@cfc-swc.gc.ca

For other information, contact:
Lisa Smylie
Director, Research, Evaluation and Planning
Policy and External Relations Directorate
Telephone: 819-420-6508 Fax: 819-420-6906
E-mail: Lisa.Smylie@cfc-swc.gc.ca

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
Any change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by Program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
The department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
Experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, Programs and services on diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people. The “plus” acknowledges that GBA goes beyond sex and gender differences to consider multiple identity factors that intersect to make people who they are (such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability).
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2018–19 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative in which two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (by Cabinet, a central agency, etc.) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Departmental Results.
Program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes)Footnote 1
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, Program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
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